T-Off Men's Health

Why Is Testosterone A Controlled Substance?


T Off Your Health specializes in testosterone treatment for men. We are primary care clinics with specialized services such as testosterone therapy, weight loss, and allergy testing and treatment.

In specializing in testosterone treatment we place a high level of patient care for those who come in for treatment. We have guidelines we must follow in compliance with the passage of the Anabolic Steroid Act of 1990 naming testosterone cypionate an anabolic steroid making it a controlled substance. We also have guidelines to follow according to the more recent Controlled Substance Act (CSA). To better understand the CSA we are going to share more information about what controlled substances are and how we ensure our patients’ wellbeing is of most importance.

Our Plan For Patient Care And Wellbeing

Our main treatment plan is based on weekly visits of patients for testosterone injections with the opportunity to speak with a provider each week ensuring any medical concerns, connected to testosterone treatment or otherwise, are being addressed frequently. Men especially dislike coming to the doctor for anything and with having weekly visits we have seen our patients increase their overall wellbeing as well as maintain healthy testosterone levels. We have made it our goal to make coming to the doctor an enjoyable experience with the addition of a sports atmosphere, t.v.’s in each room playing sports and quick scheduled appointment times unless otherwise needed.

There are other forms of testosterone therapy such as gels, patches, pellets, and self-administered injections. Though each of these options CAN be somewhat effective we have decided that for our patients highest levels of care weekly injections administered by a specialist with blood tests every 3 months is the best plan of care for our patients. We closely monitor our patients and are here for you if you have any health questions or concerns. With weekly visits, we are able to build a trusting rapport with each individual.

Understanding Controlled Substances

Controlled drugs are substances that are controlled under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This act categorizes all substances which are regulated under federal law into “schedules,” depending on how potentially dangerous they are.

5 Schedules of Drugs

The five “schedules” of drugs, detailed below, should not be confused with the five “classes” of drugs, a different way of organizing drugs according to their main properties. The five classes of drugs are narcotics, depressantsstimulantshallucinogens, and anabolic steroids.

Careful consideration has gone into this categorization. The control of drugs through law exists to protect people from the harm that these drugs can do. It is based on research from many different sources into the potential harmfulness of the drug, both to individuals and to society.

Schedule I Drugs

High Abuse Potential, No Medical Use, Unsafe

Schedule I drugs or substances have a high potential for abuse. They currently have no federally accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and there is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision.

Examples of Schedule I substances include heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and methaqualone.

Schedule II Drugs

High Abuse Potential, Medical Use, Severe Dependence Risk

Schedule II drugs or other substances also have a high potential for abuse. They differ from schedule I drugs in that they do have a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions.

Abuse of schedule II drugs may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.

Examples of Schedule II substances include morphine, phencyclidine (PCP), cocaine, methadone, and methamphetamine.

Schedule III Drugs

Lower Abuse Potential, Medical Use, Moderate or Low Dependence Risk

Schedule III drugs or other substances have less potential for abuse than the drugs or other substances in schedules I and II. They have a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.

Examples of Schedule III substances include Anabolic steroids, codeine and hydrocodone with aspirin or Tylenol, and some barbiturates.

Schedule IV Drugs

Relatively Low Abuse Potential, Medical Use, Limited Dependence Risk

The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule III. The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule III.

Examples of drugs included in schedule IV are Darvon, Talwin, Equanil, Valium, and Xanax.

Schedule V Drugs

Relatively Lower Abuse Potential, Medical Use, Limited Dependence Risk

The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule IV. The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse of the drug or other substances may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in Schedule IV.

Examples of Schedule V drugs include cough medicines with codeine.

Being a medical facility we have the ability to prescribe any of these controlled substances when we see it as the best path of care. Our medical directors have put further guidelines for our clinics and providers to follow in order to ensure our patients’ care is of the highest level.

Partial information sited from https://www.verywellmind.com/what-are-controlled-drugs-22310 .